Happy Mom Guide - Being Happier as a Mom

Welcome to Happy Mom Guide

In Be Happy, Motherhood by Punita Rice

Being a mom is the greatest blessing and gift. But it can also be hard. Joy as a mom is also a natural part of being a mom, but being a HAPPY MOM, in an ongoing, active and intentional sort of way, can take effort!

If you’re new here, first, you may want to read WHY it’s important to be a happy mom in the first place (and explains what we mean by “happy mom,” and points to the reality that happiness isn’t always easy or accessible to everyone, and that happiness does NOT mean ignoring/hiding negative feelings!!!).

For some moms, ok, maybe 24/7 happiness comes naturally, and we all have varying levels of “base” happiness. But for a lot of us, even while we’re CONTENT and HAPPY deep down, and recognize in our bones how blessed and lucky we are, the reality is that ACTIVE and ongoing happiness can be a CHOICE — one that requires work.

This is not a depressing thing. This is a FANTASTIC thing because it means you’re in control.

I believe that for a lot of us, being a HAPPY MOM requires a commitment to being intentional and grateful, and to self-care and focusing on how lucky we really are.

  • Maybe you’ve just transitioned from being a working mom to being a SAHM but you’re in need of words of support or a sense of community to help you fall in love with your new role.
  • …or maybe you want to just talk about how it’s HARD to be a stay at home mom (acknowledging it doesn’t mean we’re not focusing on being HAPPY!)
  • Maybe you’re a working mom and need words of wisdom and guidance in loving this new life and being happy as a mama.
  • Maybe you’re a brand new mom and need guidance and words of encouragement.
  • Maybe you want to talk about what it’s like going from one to two kids.
  • Maybe you LOVE being a mama but you struggle with anxiety and have strategies that make your #mamalife more manageable (and happier).

WHATEVER your circumstance, if you believe that *happiness* as a mom is at least somewhat in your own hands, this may become a website you love. (And this Facebook group is for you to connect with other moms who feel the same way!)

By the way – I know this mentality — that happiness is a choice — doesn’t appeal to everyone and not everyone believes happiness is a choice. And of course, NONE of this is a jab at, or an undermining of, actual depression (sometimes obviously happiness is not entirely in our hands) — this is instead about the portion of our happiness and mental state that IS in our hands. And for most of us, that’s a LOT of our happiness.

So, this is a website about being happier as a mom.

It will hopefully share stories and experiences from moms LOOKING for happiness, and words of wisdom and inspiration for becoming happier in our roles as mothers.


Recent posts

If you’re new here and not sure where to start, here is a list of recent blog posts:


PS – I love writing about motherhood and finding joy in it here on this website, but I’ve been missing a sense of community and moms helping one another. I’m hoping to foster that sense of community through this Facebook group for moms who want to connect with other moms dedicated to being happier. You can join it here. I’m hoping this space can be a way to connect with other like-minded mamas and exchange what works for us and share the joy. 🧡

Please consider joining this group so that we can build a community of likeminded mamas who want to share their words of wisdom and inspiration and knowledge and support.

PS – You can read more about this website here.

About the Author
Punita Rice

Punita Rice

Punita C. Rice, Ed.D is a mother, educator, writer, and founder of ISAASE. She is the author of Toddler Weaning: Deciding to Gradually Wean your Toddler & Making it Happen, and the forthcoming South Asian American Experiences in Schools: Brown Voices from the Classroom, and blogs about motherhood and being intentional about being a happy mom at Happy Mom Guide. Her education work centers around multicultural education and equity, and South Asian American experiences in school. You can read more about Punita and her work here.

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